Tag: chocolate

What makes chocolate chip cookies so addictive?

(CNN)When I reflect on my childhood baking memories, one that stands out is a tray of warm chocolate chip cookies coming out of the oven. It was so tempting to eat the raw dough while making them — talk about a lesson in delayed gratification — but in 20 or so minutes, delicious buttery, sugary cookies dotted with chocolate chips would be ready to enjoy.

Never mind fancy desserts; chocolate chip cookies have always been one of my favorite treats. And if you are like me and find them irresistible, you probably can’t stop after a few bites.
“Even today, after eating and living with them for 40 years, I still can’t stop eating them,” said Kathleen King, founder of Tate’s Bake Shop in Southampton, New York, and creator of the top-rated chocolate chip cookie according to Consumer Reports. “I am either eating no cookies, or I am eating several. I can’t have one.”
    But what exactly makes chocolate chip cookies so universally craved in the first place?

    The emotional attachment to chocolate chip cookies

    “I think a lot of it has to do with the connection to our past, whether it was a grandmother, a mother, a place visited, a summer home or family time. It’s also usually the first cookie every child learned how to make, and so I think there’s a tremendous emotional attachment and remembrance with the chocolate chip cookie,” King said. “Lifestyles are changing, but that connection is still hanging on.”
    Eating chocolate chip cookies can be associated with a range of emotions. “If I’m celebrating, I can have a couple of cookies, but if I’m sad, I want 10 cookies,” she said. “While the cookie is in your mouth, that moment is happiness — and then it’s gone, and you’re sad again, and you have another one.”
    The happiness that comes from sharing homemade chocolate chip cookies cannot be underestimated. King, who started baking chocolate chip cookies and selling them when she was 11 years old, said her biggest motivator for baking them was the joy they brought other people. “That really made me happy — and probably, a lot of people that bake will say the same thing: Sharing [chocolate chip cookies] makes people happy.”

    Addictive ingredients

    Aside from the emotional comfort that chocolate chip cookies may provide, there may be scientific explanations for why we salivate for them. Some research suggests that ingredients in chocolate chip cookies may have additive properties. Take sugar: Evidence in humans shows that sugar and sweetness can induce rewards and cravings comparable in magnitude to those induced by addictive drugs, including cocaine.
    A traditional chocolate chip cookie recipe calls for ¾ cup of granulated sugar and ¾ cup of brown sugar, yielding 10 grams, or 2.5 teaspoons, of sugar per cookie.
    Then there’s the chocolate, which, in addition to sugar, contains small amounts of a compound known as anandamide. Interestingly, anandamide is also a brain chemical that targets the same cell receptors as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the active ingredient in marijuana that is responsible for its mood-altering effects. That’s not to say chocolate will produce the same “high” as marijuana, but there may be a chemical basis for the pleasure we get from eating chocolate.
    According to Gary Wenk, director of neuroscience undergraduate programs at the Ohio State University and author of “Your Brain on Food,” high-fat, sugar-rich cookies will raise the level of anandamide in our brains independent of what’s in the cookie, because it’s our body’s response to eating such a tasty item. “The fat and sugar combine to induce our addiction as much as does the anandamide,” Wenk said. “It’s a triple play of delight.”

    Texture and flavor: Key to a cookie’s addictive characteristics

    All of this science may sound intriguing, but the simplest explanation for why chocolate chip cookies are so delectable may have to do with the mix of ingredients that combine in a way that appeals to our senses.
    “A chocolate chip cookie is a brilliant contrast among the flavors and among the textures,” said Gail Vance Civille, founder and president of Sensory Spectrum, a consulting firm that helps companies learn how sensory cues drive consumer perceptions of products.
    The flavor of chocolate chip cookies, according to Civille, is “a beautiful amalgam of caramelized butter and sugar,” the result of the browning of butter and caramelizing of sugar while it bakes. The combination of the toasted grain with the browned butter, caramelized sugar, vanilla and chocolate are “the beautiful rich flavors that blend together in a chocolate chip cookie,” she said. And as the chocolate melts, it becomes more aromatic and punches up the flavor.
    It sounds counterintuitive, but salt is important too, even in sweet treats. “It is what adds interest to food, even if it’s a sweet food, because it makes the sugar and other ingredients taste better and come together better,” Civille said. “A pinch of salt in cookies really makes a difference, and it enhances sweetness a little bit.”
    King noted that “with Tate’s, we were the first to do the thin and crisp, which is kind of an addictive mouthfeel, and we were also the first to do a little bit heaver on the salt. People don’t even put salt in cookies, but [without salt], it tastes flat.”
    Other secrets to making delicious chocolate chip cookies include using butter instead of shortening or margarine; brown sugar, which has a molasses-like quality to it; and pure vanilla, according to King. A high-quality flour and a really good chocolate chip are also important.
    The texture of chocolate chip cookies also plays a big role in their appeal. “Just on the texture side, [the chocolate chip cookie] has a lot going for it,” Civille said.
    “Every bite will be interesting. … You will hit the cookie, which has crispness due to air pockets in the cookie crumb, and then the chocolate, which is dense and uniform when you bite through it. It’s like a symphony orchestra playing together. … It’s very harmonious,” she said.
    One of the simplest ways to test whether the flavor and texture of chocolate chip cookies are “addictive enough” is to observe people eating them.
    “When I would create any product, if I put it out as a sample to my staff and if I didn’t watch them unconsciously go back and take some more, then I felt it wasn’t good enough. There’s a lot of good, but I didn’t want good. I wanted that addictive thing,” King said.

    Personal preferences

    Although there are some universally appealing qualities of chocolate chip cookies that make them so addictive, specific preferences may vary from person to person. One may crave chocolate chip cookies that are soft and gooey; another may long for crispy, crunchy cookies.
    Most people prefer semisweet chips, which have a soft melting quality that can lend itself to a more addictive mouthfeel with the crunchy caramelized cookie, according to King. But some may opt for milk chocolate, and others may like the taste of bittersweet chocolate in their cookies.
    The optimal ratio of chocolate chips to cookie is also a personal preference. “I’ll put a bag on the table, and my husband will turn them over and look for the least amount of chips, but I’ll look for the most,” King said.

    A happy indulgence

    Whatever one’s individual chocolate chip cookie preference — or “addiction” — it’s fair to say that these beloved cookies can have a place in a balanced diet, as long as you are willing to keep portions in check.

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    “The main thing is not to think of food as good food and bad food. It’s all good. It’s how much you eat of it,” King said. “I used to be overweight, and I had that in my mind, if I ate a cookie, that was bad and now the day is ruined, instead of just, ‘that’s cool.’ “
    So whether it feels like a true “addiction” or not, indulging in a chocolate chip cookie or two should be a happy experience.
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    7 healthy desserts you’ll want to Instagram immediately

    Image: Thrive Market

    No matter how many times I look through my Instagram feed and salivate over beautifully curated pictures of rainbow sprinkled banana splits, dense chocolate cakes, glistening glazed donuts, and stacks of ooey-gooey brownies, I fail to go the extra step in actually copying the recipe and making them. Not because I dont think I can, but because these desserts contain hundreds of calories and artificial ingredients that Id rather not consume and later regret.

    Luckily, there are always healthy alternatives to these favorite treats made with nutritious ingredient swapsand they can be just as picturesque while still remaining gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, low-cal, and/or sugar-free.

    Here is just one gallery of mouthwatering, healthy dessertsand you might not even be able to see or taste the difference! Thats because all of these dishes are made with rich, wholesome ingredients that you can actually pronounce rather than containing artificial sugars and flavorings. If youre going to enjoy dessert, why not make it good for your body and leave you feeling guilt-free, too?

    Image: Thrive Market

    Chocolate avocado mousse

    Spoiler alert: This beautiful mousse didnt come from Martha Stewarts cookbook. In fact, it was developed right in Thrive Markets own kitchen. While most chocolate whips are filled with empty calories and sugar, this unconventional dish spins that notion on its head. Believe it or not, this rich, chocolatey treat is made with only four ingredients: avocado, raw cacao, pure maple syrup, and mixed berries.

    For the full Insta effect, serve in small ramekins with blackberries on top (this extra step also makes it prime for a decadent dinner party). Whatever the occasion may be, though, this sweet treat always does the trick without any added sugar. Even better, this chocolate avocado mousse can be made in five minutes, which is great if youre in a time crunch or looking for a quick fix.

    Image: Thrive Market

    Double Chocolate Brownie Bites

    Brownies are a dessert staple with unlimited variations from double chocolate to cream cheese, even pumpkin-spiced, theres no shortage of creative ideas for this chocolatey mini-cake.

    Whats different about this recipe, though, is that its totally Paleo and grain-free; instead, these bites are made with ground flaxseeds, raw cacao powder, Medjool dates, vanilla extract, and of course dark chocolate. While they taste good on their own, you can also create a brownie sundae a la mode (with dairy-free ice cream) for the picture perfect finishing touch.

    Image: Thrive Market

    Gluten-free vegan chocolate strawberry truffles

    Next time you need an unforgettable gift, whip up a batch of these healthy homemade truffles that will leave your friends and family speechless (especially since they will be trying to get in every last bite). These rich little treats look picturesque when wrapped up together (see some of our tips for eco-friendly packing) but the real joy comes in devouring the full-bodied fruity flavors: each truffle is made with ripe Medjool dates, juicy strawberries, and unsweetened coconut flakes and then covered in crushed walnuts, cacao powder, and ground cinnamon, which helps to hold them together and provide a slightly firm texture. Since these tasty bites are made with all-natural ingredients (including no added sugar), and require no baking, they also qualify as a scrumptious raw dessert, too.

    Image: Thrive Market

    Coconut creme brulee

    Creme brulee has been around since the late 1600s, allowing ample time for it to be perfected and recreated over the yearsincluding Thrive Markets own exotic coconut variety. Though its made from only five ingredients (vanilla beans, coconut cream, egg yolks, coconut sugar, and a pinch of salt), this dish tastes like it came from a five-star kitchen.

    The custard itself is Paleo-friendly and gluten-free and still includes the classic hardened top, made from a pinch of the coconut sugar and a handheld pastry torch. Serve at your next gathering, but be prepared for a round of pictures before you can actually dig in.

    Image: Thrive Market

    Rosemary orange polenta cake

    Moist and hearty texture meets bright citrus flavor in these European-inspired cakes that are ready for their photo shoot right out of the oven. Because each is miniature in size, theyre great for anyone watching portion control and can also be easily taken on-the-go for a quick pick-me-up. In Italy, where the recipe hails from, these desserts are known as tea cakes and are served in the afternoon with a side of fresh berries and a hot cup of Earl Grey.

    Because these desserts are made with polenta rather than wheat flour, they also qualify as a great dessert option for anyone with a gluten intolerance or Celiac disease. But that doesnt mean people without food allergies cant still enjoy them, too!

    Image: Thrive Market

    Almond Butter Cups

    Skip the candy aisle and make a handful of these dark chocolate almond butter cups at home. If you dont have a chocolate factory waiting for you there, its okay, since this creative recipe uses only a mini cupcake tin and simple ingredients such as almond butter, maple syrup, raw honey, coconut oil, vanilla, and sea saltand thats it!

    The creaminess from the almond butter goes perfectly with the hard chocolate shell, while the pinch of sea salt sprinkled on top becomes a great contrast to the sweet, nutty flavor. Make them ahead of time (each batch creates two dozen treats) and wrap up for sweet bites on-the-go or an incredibly generous gift. Just dont forget to capture a picture for Instagram so everyone can like your hard work.

    Image: Thrive Market

    Triple ginger cookies with pomegranate molasses

    If youre looking for basic cookies, youve come to the wrong place. This batch has double the pleasure bite into this scrumptious dessert and first youll experience a kick of hot ginger that tingles the tongue before the dense pomegranate molasses cools things off. The result is a a great contrast of flavors in one small treat that looks just as good as it tastes.

    For even more photo-ready presentation, stack a few of them high on a plate and serve alongside a helping of candied ginger or blackberries. Another option is warming them up and serving with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top, which adds an additional perfect combination of hot meets cold. See for yourself how this unique fusion delights a crowd, especially as it racks up all those Instagram likes.

    This article originally published at Thrive Market here

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